Amazing grays

19 09 2011

A wall of clocks, ArtBox, The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands

“GRAY’S ANATOMY initially appealed to me.  However, I later realized that none of the pieces I captured on stills for this post has a sapphire crystal exhibition case back – unlike the Hamilton Automatic I had since handed to my youngest brother a couple of weeks back.

But “Amazing grays” does sound appropriate and succinct.

This is only my third post since I decided to rise from above the ebb that was my couple months’ hiatus from blogging.  I thought that the last one (all about my fixation with Formosa Delightstomato noodle soup) had taken care of the “Munch” part of what my blog stands for when I conceptualized it.

To really signify my return, I think it’s high time to talk about – what else?! – Time!

I have been so blessed and so grateful to be able to indulge in my passions.  And while we can never attach any material worth or price tag – yes, this is your cue to sing “that song” – to all the things that really do matter in life, sometimes we need something tangible, concrete… something we can perceive with three or four of the five senses, to help us mark the moment.

I do that through wristwatches.

Here’s a reveal of what I have chosen to mark my move to Singapore.

I shall never forget the circumstances, the sentiments, and the sleepless nights that went with each purchase.  I won’t admit to any of these being an impulsive buy – except for that one wristwatch that I saw on someone on board the MRT ride to Somerset.  Right there and then, I just had to have one for myself.

Here’s my first ever investment timepiece that I bought on my own – the Rolex Oyster Perpetual Air-King in all-stainless steel.  It costs right around how much I was willing to fork over for my first real luxury wristwatch.  The “Air-King” is sought after for its history, reliability, movement, classic design (I love the simplicity), and of course as with ALL Rolexes, collectible value.  I made the purchase at The Hour Glass at Takashimaya S.C. on Orchard Road.  Days after, I received in the mail a personal letter from the store, signed by the manager and the sales associate who attended to me, thanking me for my purchase.  Let’s just say that they’re now on my Blackberry contacts list.  Hehe.

I could hear and feel my heartbeat when I laid the box out to open it for the first time at home.

 

Be still my beating heart...

 

I love all the paperwork that goes with a wristwatch.

 

Now it's really getting closer to the reveal...

 

Meet my new Rolex Oyster Perpetual Air-King! Ta-daaaahhh!

 

This one deserves a closer look.

 

A tight shot of a thing of such beauty.

I saw this next one on someone’s wrist on board the short train ride from Dhoby Ghaut interchange to Somerset.  I was initially attracted to the very Franck Muller Hindu-Arabic numerals on the white dial.  Once off at the station, I frantically searched for a watch store that has this brand’s counter.  It’s one of those ‘I’ve got to have it!’ moments.  Hahaha!  I found one at Eastern Watch, on the ground level of 313@somerset.  Sadly, they – as with most, if not all, other watch stores on the island – didn’t carry this style in their usual store display.  So what was left to do?  Get it on special order, to be delivered overnight!  So here it is, my Tissot Heritage Prince I wristwatch.  This was first released in 1916, noted for its curved body that hugs the wrist snugly but comfortably.  It was re-issued in 1991 as the Classic Prince, and now, as the Heritage Prince I.

My new Tissot Heritage Prince I!

 

A closer look... I do love the very bold numbers on the dial! It doesn't register well on this print but the hour and minute hands are in a nice shade of blue.

 

This gorgeous timepiece has a luxuriously stamped genuine leather strap and snaps in place with a deployment clasp with buckle.

 

I think this shot somehow captures the "blue-ness" of the hour and minute hands. I love this wristwatch!

Before making this move to the Lion City, I decided to let go of most of my wristwatches.  I don’t think I needed all of them with me.  By the time I hopped on that flight in late June, I had only decided to keep a few pieces, those with sentimental value.

Here’s my three-year old Philip Stein Signature Large – my first of four – fitted for the first time with an all-stainless steel bracelet, sourced for me exclusively by the wonderful team at Chronos in Alabang Town Center.  The bracelet is meant for use just on my wrist but it cost me an arm and a leg.  Hahaha!  It’s well-worth it, anyway.

My Philip Stein Signature Large sports a new look with an all-stainless steel bracelet.

 

The new bracelet locks with a double deployment clasp.

 

The beauty and ease of Philip Stein bracelets and straps is that you can replace them with just a quick and simple (sidewards) pulling action on the clasp that is underneath the strap.

The oldest piece that I carried with me – I’d already handed down to my nephews my first three Casio wristwatches (a Classic, a Data Bank, and a Solar battery-operated one) – is this Swiss Army Automatic, with the beautiful sweeping second hand in orange.  This one is easily about a couple of decades old.

My decades-old Swiss Army wristwatch! I brought it to Singapore, from home, the last time I went back. My brother had it go through maintenance check with his trusted jeweler-horologer friend.

 

This watch has a "paper" face. So classic.

 

I love the orange sweeping second hand. (I didn't realize I captured it here at the 12 o'clock position. Nice.)

And that to me really is the allure of timepieces.  It is with you as you make your travel through time.  More than their monetary value, the appeal of wristwatches that have lasted through time is more emotional.  It’s like a real, trustworthy, will-never-leave-you friend.

And clearly here in Singapore, there’s more room in my life for them.

Me and my Rolex, on board a Singapore Airlines flight, September 2011.

 

 

Copyright © 2011 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.

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