Making a list, checking it twice

16 11 2014

I’VE BEEN searching the Christmas shop window displays so much lately that I must have seen more windows than a Medieval artist working on stained glass.  Not that I’m complaining.  I guess the phrase “the most wonderful time of the year” also does apply to the visual feast that is the vitrines.  Besides, whatever retail therapy I do is in the pursuit of making someone happy, my contribution to a little more altruism in this world.

And I couldn’t think of any other better way to wait out an hour–long torrential downpour than in the confines of well–appointed shops, ensconced and out of the rain.

Blue is indeed the warmest color.  Louis Vuitton always does an excellent job dressing up their windows.  For this holiday season, it coincides with the Delphine Arnault–Nicolas Ghesquiere–initiated project dubbed “Celebrating Monogram,’ in commemoration of the house’s 160TH founding.  This is my favorite – “F.G.” stands for the iconoclast, THE Frank Gehry.

Blue is indeed the warmest color. Louis Vuitton always does an excellent job dressing up their windows. For this holiday season, it coincides with the Delphine Arnault–Nicolas Ghesquiere–initiated project dubbed “Celebrating Monogram,’ in commemoration of the house’s 160TH founding. This is my favorite – “F.G.” stands for the architecture iconoclast, THE Frank Gehry.

 

If there is ever any doubt as to who is paying homage to the monogram at this display.

If there is ever any doubt as to who is paying homage to the monogram at this display.

 

Frank Gehry's celebration of the monogram is structured, contemporary, cutting edge.  Much like the Fondation Louis Vuitton, this bag is a "cathedral of light" and a "miracle of intelligence, creativity, and technology."

Frank Gehry‘s celebration of the monogram is structured, contemporary, cutting edge. Much like the Fondation Louis Vuitton, this bag is a “cathedral of light” and a “miracle of intelligence, creativity, and technology.”

 

I know someone very close to me who will love everything on this display.  I’ve never been one to fall head over heels over Louis Vuitton.  But these, I’m feeling like I could love these too.  Okay, “like,” I mean I could like these too.

I know someone very close to me who will love everything on this display. I’ve never been one to fall head over heels over Louis Vuitton. But these, I’m feeling like I could love these too. Okay, “like,” I mean I could like these too.

 

This is Comme de Garçons’ Rei Kawakubo’s interpretation of the Louis Vuitton monogram, seen on someone who obviously doesn’t have any qualms snapping it up for the US$ 2790 price tag it commands.

This is Comme de GarçonsRei Kawakubo’s interpretation of the Louis Vuitton monogram, seen on someone who obviously doesn’t have any qualms snapping it up for the US$ 2790 price tag it commands.

 

Frank Gehry’s works dominate print media.  The Twisted Box monogram bag, which retails at US$ 4400, on a magazine ad, vis-à-vis Fondation Louis Vuitton, that “spaceship” that was dropped on to Paris.  Both of these are new testaments to Frank Gehry’s status as a truly legendary architect – small– and big–scale.

Frank Gehry’s works dominate print media. The Twisted Box monogram bag, which retails at US$ 4400, on a magazine ad, vis-à-vis Fondation Louis Vuitton, that “spaceship” that was dropped on to Paris. Both of these are new testaments to Frank Gehry’s status as a truly legendary architect – small– and big–scale.

 

The Mulberry Men’s signature Brynmore Tote in Black, Evergreen & Midnight Blue Reverse Small Grain bovine leather tote.  Someone on my list wants this for Christmas.  Haha!  It comes with an adjustable woven cross–body strap and a set of three of the brand’s signature postman’s locks.

The Mulberry Men’s signature Brynmore Tote in Black, Evergreen & Midnight Blue Reverse Small Grain bovine leather tote. Someone on my list wants this for Christmas. Haha! It comes with an adjustable woven cross–body strap and a set of three of the brand’s signature postman’s locks.

 

I love that the Mulberry Brynmore Tote has a buffed up (“finished”) inner leather.  It can be worn across the body, or carried by the leather handles.  Really in love with this one.

I love that the Mulberry Brynmore Tote has a buffed up (“finished”) inner leather. It can be worn across the body, or carried by the leather handles. Really in love with this one.  I should be.  It costs almost S$ 3000!

 

The Mulberry Brynmore – in the Tote and Slim Messenger incarnations – in Grey Soft Grain leather.  Be still my heart.

The Mulberry Brynmore – in the Tote and Slim Messenger incarnations – in Grey Soft Grain leather. Be still my heart.

 

I have no complaints with my decades–old carry–on luggage, but then I saw this Mulberry Oversized Bayswater in Oak Natural Leather.  I am seriously considering to switch.  This has got to be the perfect weekend duffel or business trip bag!  You can’t help but love the antique toned metal components and that iconic postman’s lock closure!

I have no complaints with my decades–old carry–on luggage, but then I saw this Mulberry Oversized Bayswater in Oak Natural Leather. I am seriously considering to switch. This has got to be the perfect weekend duffel or business trip bag! You can’t help but love the antique toned metal components and that iconic postman’s lock closure!

 

This year’s Takashimaya S.C. Christmas Tree is brought to you by Cartier!  To me, Takashimaya’s is arguably one of the best – if not the best – on Orchard Road.  Its lighting up is an event on its own.

This year’s Takashimaya S.C. Christmas Tree is brought to you by Cartier! To me, Takashimaya’s is arguably one of the best – if not the best – on Orchard Road. Its lighting up is an event on its own.

 

If there is ever any doubt as to who’s in charge with this year’s tree, all you need to do is look closely to see the signature red boxes or the brand’s monogram in gold.

If there is ever any doubt as to who’s in charge with this year’s tree, all you need to do is look closely to see the signature red boxes or the brand’s monogram in gold.

 

…Or, you can simply look up to see the storeys–high scroll that brandishes a signature timepiece from, yes, Cartier.  Look, up in the sky.  It’s a bird!  It’s a plane!  No, it’s the Ballon Bleu de Cartier!

…Or, you can simply look up to see the storeys–high scroll that brandishes a signature timepiece from, yes, Cartier. Look, up in the sky. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s the Ballon Bleu de Cartier!

 

The other eye–catching Christmas tree is all–pink, also located at Takashimaya S.C., and is by Laduree.  Yes, purveyors of some of the most scrumptious Macarons De Paris!

The other eye–catching Christmas tree is all–pink, also located at Takashimaya S.C., and is by Laduree. Yes, purveyors of some of the most scrumptious Macarons De Paris!

 

Copyright © 2014 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.





Frankly speaking

18 10 2014

THE VITRINE had literally vanished from my field of view with the intensity – and it has to be said, some semblance of a most deep longing – at which I stayed transfixed at this then newly unveiled time teller.  The debate in my head had drowned the sales associate’s repeated enquiries (“Sir, do you want to try it on?”), limiting my multi–tasking to only gazing at the object’s rather unusual dial with a consuming, tempestuous, fervent desire I had only read about in books.  Until then.

The limited edition "FRANK GEHRY with FOSSIL" GH–1011, with a solid titanium case and a mirror dial

The limited edition “FRANK GEHRY with FOSSIL” GH–1011, with a solid titanium case and a mirror dial

Yet, I passed up on the opportunity to strap it on – the limited edition FRANK GEHRY with FOSSIL wristwatch.  The year was 2004.  And it has turned out to be a regret that shall haunt me through these years, especially since it has proven to be so elusive, inexistent even in the deepest recesses of the connected cyberspace.

It was as if I was living with a frazzled fate built upon the thought that I shall never come across such a beautiful ticktocker ever again.

Fast forward to 10 years hence, an assignment in the City of Trees, a fateful visit to Google, and a serendipitous tickling of the keyboard.  I secured the find, breathless in anticipation all throughout the three–day wait for the auction to close, and with the reckless abandon I would channel at karaoke, blurted out. “the search is over.”  Haha!

I have the utmost respect for architects, and clearly for their collaborations with mainstream brands.  Frank Gehry the American–Canadian famous for the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, among many other works that include his house in Santa Monica, California, is at the pinnacle of my list.

A recent feature on Singapore's The Straits Times, "HEAD OF THE CURVE" by Natasha Ann Zachariah brought Frank Gehry – and the wrist watch he designed for FOSSIL – back to mind.

A recent feature on Singapore’s The Straits Times, “HEAD OF THE CURVE” by Natasha Ann Zachariah brought Frank Gehry – and the wrist watch he designed for FOSSIL – back to mind.

 

One of Frank Gehry's more recent projects is for Louis Vuitton!

One of Frank Gehry’s more recent projects is for Louis Vuitton!

Finding the FRANK GEHRY with FOSSIL GH–1011, with a solid titanium case and a mirror dial, felt like an accomplishment.  I wore it first to the opening of The Amazing Spider–Man at the downtown Edwards Cinemas, and then tucked it away in its box.

The watch comes in a most beautiful metal box!

The watch comes in a most beautiful metal box!

 

Don't you just love all the things they put on the back of the watch?  I mean, except when it's an automatic and an exhibition caseback.  Haha!  Notice that this says, "solid titanium case"?  That's why it looks hefty but is nowhere near heavy at all.

Don’t you just love all the things they put on the back of the watch? I mean, except when it’s an automatic and an exhibition caseback. Haha! Notice that this says, “solid titanium case”? That’s why it looks hefty but is nowhere near heavy at all.

 

The inscription on the casual center bar metal buckle is just a lovely touch.

The inscription on the casual center bar metal buckle is just a lovely touch.

 

I saw this wall at Edward's and couldn't help but scream, "I blend!!!"  Haha!  Ok, the proper caption here is that the first time I wore the wrist watch was to the opening screening of The Amazing Spider-Man.

I saw this wall at Edward’s and couldn’t help but scream, “I blend!!!” Haha! Ok, the proper caption here is that the first time I wore the wrist watch was to the opening screening of The Amazing Spider-Man.

I had long professed that for me, the wrist watch is my ultimate material expression of the highest regard I could give someone.  So I would be the least surprised if I’d give this away.  The thrill of the find – after all – had been satiated.

I find that the beauty of this design lies in the imperfection of the handwriting, which to me is the art that is really endangered ("Tell me, when was the last time you wrote something by hand?  Signing the credit card receipt doesn't count!").  I just love Gehry's "signature" and the way the hour markers really have the handwritten feel.

I find that the beauty of this design lies in the imperfection of the handwriting, which to me is the art that is really endangered (“Tell me, when was the last time you wrote something by hand? Signing the credit card receipt doesn’t count!”). I just love Gehry’s “signature” and the way the hour markers really have the handwritten feel.

Copyright © 2014 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.





I heart SQ

21 08 2012

I always take photographs of the wing of the airplane I’m on. (Wing, Boeing 777-200 Twin Jet)

WHILE MOST of my Singaporean and Malaysian friends expressed concern about my family’s welfare when monsoon rains submerged 90% of Metro Manila, I had more pressing concerns in mind.  Mama had been ill – getting confined in the hospital twice in a couple of weeks, spaced less than 12 hours apart – and just like any child thousands of miles away, I knew I’d rather be home.

Fortunately for me, I always have a Singapore Airlines ticket ready for me when I am.

I was anxious the whole time during this trip.  But somehow, flying with Singapore Airlines felt like flying with family.  On the Singapore–Manila leg (SQ918), I got my favorite seat and almost instantly, I was already home, up in the air, 30,000 feet in the skies.

Since the flight wasn’t even half-full, I could be quick to charge the impeccable inflight service to be due to the low flight attendant-to-passenger ratio.  There was plenty of attention to be spread.  But having been a loyal Singapore Airlines passenger all these years, I know better that the service was just their usual – top notch and uncompromising.  Actually, the operative word here is “usual.”  Why?  It is because they have been consistent at this excellent service level that anybody will be quick to dismiss any new experience to be – there’s that word again – the usual.

But having my anxieties brushed away, even for the three and a half hours I was airborne, I couldn’t help but feel grateful to the inflight crew.  Hui Hui (I hope I got her name right) was especially helpful that I just had to write her a thank you note.

I realized I was wandering aimlessly when I reached Gate E20 and when I looked up my flight’s boarding gate, it was E8. I was way off! It was on the other end of the terminal. Hehe.

 

On the way to my gate, I had to take a snapshot of Gate E5. It’s my favorite letter and number.

 

Whenever I pass by a mirrored wall…

 

Finally, Gate E8!

 

Comfortably ensconced in my favorite seat, the first at this section.

 

My favorite seat

 

I can’t look at this emergency door – right beside a flight attendant’s takeoff/landing station – without having images of action movies in my head. Haha!

 

I get all the papers available by the plane door – Financial Times (FT) Weekend, The Business Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Straits Times.

 

The moment I get in my seat, I work on the disembarkation card and the customs declaration.

 

As you can see, I always have my favorite pens with me – the Parker from my good friend Jian Cheng and the Bic from Timothy.

 

Amidst turbulence, I had to write down a quote from the movie I was watching.

 

Tiger Woods was giving me the eye. “Finish your papers, eNTeNG!”

 

Time check!

 

All of my travel papers and stuff – passport, e-Ticket, boarding pass, EP – are organized in this Muji passport holder. This was one of the first things I ever bought in Singapore.

 

I always travel comfortably, which this time meant my red Zappi shoes and khaki Topman shorts. My top was my five-year-old custom fit Ralph Lauren piqué polo shirt.

 

After the movie “The Lucky One,” I caught up on an episode of one of my favorite TV shows Grey’s Anatomy. That’s one of my favorite characters, the feisty Dr. Cristina Yang.

 

Dinner has landed!

 

I had stir fried fish in dry chilli and Chinese wine, seasonal vegetables and fried rice. For starters, I munched on a pasta salad of marinated seafood and penne.

 

For dessert, it was tiramisu “Ais Krim”.

The Manila–Singapore leg (SQ921) was full.  Getting yet another one of my favored seats was just half of the pleasant flight.  The other half was taken care of by the attentive, thoughtful crew.  I took note of one name – Lynn.  Again, I hope I got it right (her last name starts with H).

While some of my fellow passengers opted to drown the occasional turbulence with gin and tonic or Johnny Walker Black with orange juice, I chose to wash everything away with my favorite Campbell’s Tomato Juice.

By the second refill I heard the most beautiful words, “Would you like a whole can?”  I heard that in both flights.  I heart Singapore Airlines.

Before I knew it, it was time to go back to the Lion City.

 

NAIA was full! There lines everywhere.

 

As an Overseas Filipino Worker (OFW), I had to fall in line to get my papers validated.

 

Ladies and gentlemen, the King of Pop!… “I’m starting with the man in the mirror…”

 

This flight was a bit delayed, but nothing disappointing. We were kept posted on the progress. By the way, it was raining when we took off.

 

For inflight reading, I brought a book from my bookshelf at home, Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster by Dana Thomas.

 

This show “Cupcake Wars” caught my attention.

 

Of the many movie choices, I decided on the 80’s classic Ghostbusters starring, among many others, the very beautiful Sigourney Weaver. I remember seeing this movie as a kid.

 

A young Bill Murray. I still think he should’ve gotten the Oscar for “Lost in Translation.”

 

Finally the food has arrived!

 

I had couple of these warmed rolls!

 

Dinner is served! – pork spare ribs with preserved soya beans (rendered like a most sumptuous sauce), chicken rice (yum!), and steamed seasonal vegetables (though the menu did say Chinese mushroom).

 

The spare ribs were actually served boneless. The meat was really tender, moist and flavorful. Having watched enough Top Chef, I know exactly the exacting skill needed to dish out such a scrumptious meal.

 

I fell in love with this smoked duck and green mango salad. I have to say, I was mesmerized by the tangy dressing.

 

I must’ve gone through three of these. I lost count. I wouldn’t be surprised if the flight attendant would decide to start charging me. Hahaha!

 

Back in Singapura! This was my first time landing at Terminal 3. The place is just breathtakingly beautiful!

 

The place is huge!

 

I turn into a kid in a candy store whenever I’m faced by this Visitor Information rack. I have to say, I get my fill of the latest. Hahaha!

 

Please proceed to Belt 41 to claim your baggage.

 

I said I had fragile stuff inside. Little did I know, my luggage would get this treatment. Haha!

 

My excel spreadsheets at work are always colorful. So I love looking at this flight indicator board.

 

I love taking the last flight out of Manila all the time. Because I arrive in Singapore to a taxi queue that looks like this.

 

This was the lightest I have ever traveled in years. But still I managed to pack in some stuff for some special people back at my second home.

 

Copyright © 2012 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved





Dispatch from the edgiest

7 02 2011

Anderson Cooper's "Dispatches from the Edge: A Memoir of War, Disasters, and Survival" (together with a couple of magazines about a favorite personality, Ms. Daphne Oseña Paez, and a favorite hobby, wristwatch collection)

DISPATCHES FROM The Edge:  A Memoir of War, Disasters, and Survival by CNN anchor Anderson Cooper is one of my favorite books of all time.  I read it first in 2010 and I’ve been meaning to write about it in length here.  Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to doing it.

I got reminded of it when I saw on the news that Anderson Cooper and his crew had been attacked while covering the current crisis in Cairo – that’s 4 C’s! – something that the likes of Christiane Amanpour had denounced.  I think Anderson is alright, having seen his recent broadcast from an “undisclosed” location.

I think he’s not one to run away from where the action is.  But I hope he decides what’s in the best interest of his personal safety, taking into consideration the concern of his family and everybody who cares about him.

CBS’s Katie Couric and NBC’s Brian Williams have just gotten out of Cairo.  I hope to hear that Anderson Cooper follows suit.  Soon.

Anderson Cooper's book and a text from Friendship

 

Copyright © 2011 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.





Back at the Northwest Building

13 09 2010

Four campus journalists whose opinions matter, featured in the Philippine Star.

I READ an article in the Philippine Star a couple of weeks ago that brought me back to that small office at the Northwest Building where I sat at the biggest table at the back of the room.  Back when I was in college.  Yes, I studied where they named buildings after cardinal compass points.

Like the four twenty-somethings in the feature, I too served as the Editor-In-Chief of my school paper – both in college at The New Builder at the Mapúa Institute of Technology, and in high school at The New Beam at the Mapúa Pre-Engineering Technological High School.  I vividly recall being told to have topped a field of 125 aspirants for reportorial staff openings in college.  Of all that I wrote in the tryout, I hold the one about handling criticism, closest to my heart.

During my time I already felt like a rock star, writing my articles in Wordstar and laboring over the dummies a.k.a. mock-ups.  After classes, I’d take one of those beat-up buses to make it to our printing press somewhere on the way to the University of the Philippines.

There was always one issue I’d look forward to releasing every year.  And like most campus journalists, I had my share of being summoned to the president’s office over a controversial piece.  I was told that I was supposed to be let go by those uncomfortable with what we wrote – but they just couldn’t as I was at the top of my class.

Ah, memories.

I can’t wipe off this smile on my face as I read this write-up.  Gosh, the kids nowadays.  And all the gadgets and the power of the internet at their fingertips.  I feel so old.

Copyright © 2010 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.





A thing that makes me happy

17 08 2010

Part of my collection of Teodoro "Teddyboy" L. Locsin, Jr.'s "Free Fire" in TODAY

I AM A COMPLETE NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS junkie.  In this day and age when information travels through optical cables underground and underwater, beamed through satellites in dizzying speed, I still crave for the feel of paper between my fingers, not the click of a mouse, when I wake up in the morning.

So you see, I love newspapers.  I still belong to the old school – okay, ancient – people who prefer to pay for the content that they read.  Not that there’s anything wrong about totally relying on what’s made available free on the net.

For a couple of weekends now, I’ve devoted a huge chunk of my weekends to preserving my more-than-a-decade-old stash of newspaper clippings.  By preserving, I don’t really mean slipping each clipping in a polyester-film folder with a sheet of alkaline-buffered paper as the backing.  No.

I simply mean cutting each article to size – or cutting them into two to three parts – then pasting them on white bond paper.  My specifics are quite simply sourced – legal sized (8½” x 13”) “substance 24” bond paper, and a heavy-duty glue stick that glides on smooth.  Of course there’s the trusty cutter, and a lot of plastic rulers (I end up cutting their edges so I go through them quite fast).

My newspaper clippings run a gamut of feature subjects – wristwatches, wristwatch stores, restaurants, recipes, food, Teodoro “Teddyboy” L. Locsin, Jr., interviews, the “Playtime” features in the Philippine Daily Inquirer, Margarita Araneta Fores, and Kris Aquino.  Yes, Kris Aquino.  But only her broadsheet interviews and stories about her advocacies – not the sleazy showbiz gossip people make up about her.

Some of my favorites

"What's respect got to do with newspapers?"

My all-time favorite from his "Free Fire" column... "Really something about Mary."

As for columnists, I’ve collected and continue to collect the works of Teodoro “Teddyboy” L. Locsin, Jr. (his “Free Fire” in TODAY), Kris Aquino (her “Kris & Tell” in the Philippine Daily Inquirer in the early 2000s), Celine R. Lopez (“From Coffee To Cocktails” – the one with the really nice essays), Winnie Collas Monsod, and Jessica Zafra (from “Twisted” in TODAY to “Emotional Weather Report” in the Philippine Star).  For a while, I followed Scott R. Garceau.  But not anymore.

"Kris and Tell" from a decade ago!

One clipping that made mention of the late former president's fresh corned beef. Just reading about it whets my appetite!

So far, I’ve finished working on Mr. Locsin’s.  I’m contemplating on starting Jessica Zafra’s.  But that’s quite a lot.  I’m daunted to say the least.

Jessica Zafra from over a decade ago!

That's the look of a writer who seriously means business.

Part of my Jessica Zafra collection is this thick! Though, I want to clarify that I still buy the books.

Working with newspaper clippings can be a dirty job. Hehehe.

Copyright © 2010 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.





A feast that pleased the eyes and the belly

9 08 2010

Kanin Club Turon a la mode

OUR VISITORS had ribs at Racks the night before.  So when they go home to Singapore, it would be quite hard to claim that they have had authentic Filipino cuisine.  Definitely, they couldn’t put a check mark yet by “eat local food” on their to-do list.

Our renowned Filipino hospitality would be all for naught if we were not to solve this seeming conundrum for our first-time visitors.

Fortunately, they were billeted at the best hotel south of Manila – also the house of my favorite ube ensaymada – that it was quite easy to decide where we’d host them for dinner.  And it didn’t hurt that our restaurant choice made it to the first ever edition of the Miele Guide, launched in Singapore in the 2008/2009 season – Kanin Club at Westgate in Alabang.  (Now on its third year, the Miele Guide has established itself, in its creator’s own words, to be the most credible, independent and respected system through which restaurants are evaluated across Asia.  Before a restaurant makes it to the list, it goes through four rounds of gruelling evaluation and voting.  More details are available at www.mieleguide.com.)

I didn’t have my trusty Canon IXUS 860IS with me that evening.  That explains the lack of food photos on this post.  My colleague Lester did have his Nikon D3000, but I didn’t want to impose my shoot-first-eat-later policy (hahaha!).  But by dessert time, I was able to oblige him to snap a couple of shots of the fabulous KC Turon a la Mode.  I found myself having to describe it on-the-spot to one of our guests.  I called it a dessert of banana slices stuffed with a strip of ripe jackfruit, purple yam jam, sweetened young coconut strips and red mung beans, dusted with dark brown sugar, rolled in rice paper and deep-fried.  The caramelization on the wrapper was achieved by adding more brown sugar while frying.  Kanin Club added a sprinkling of toasted sesame seeds as a finishing touch.

Yet another Kanin Club Turon a la mode!

Kanin Club, while unmistakably a casual dining place, boasts interiors replete with the upper class, almost elitist air of Filipino houses during Spain’s 333-year occupation of the Philippines.  The walls intersperse modern glass and old stained glass windows.  The dining table has the shadow box treatment as the top glass protects underneath wood-and-capiz-shells window panels that appear to have actually been taken from old houses.  And save for the booth cushions and some of the chairs, there are a lot of the wrought iron chairs that my grandmother had at home when I was a kid.  A couple of those have survived to this day – one actually “sits” by my brother’s bed, doubling as the night table.

After the interiors had provided the initial feast for the eyes – and opening conversational pieces – it was the food that eventually had our guests and ourselves talking.  As we explained to our three guests, while there still remains very distinguishable and characteristic Filipino dishes, Filipino food has also evolved, imbibing the best influences of Chinese, Indian, American, and Spanish cuisine, among others.

This was how our check looked like (all descriptions, mine).  For our appetizers – Squid in Salt & Pepper (fresh tender squid dredged in a light batter and deep-fried, served with a sweet spicy sauce), Kinilaw na Blue Marlin (chunks of fresh blue marlin “cooked” in vinegar and citrus juices, with minced shallots, ginger and chilies), Tokwa’t Baboy (cubes of deep-fried tofu with slivers of tender pork in a dressing of vinegar, soy sauce and chopped onions), and Gambas con Kabute (fresh jumbo shrimps and mushrooms sautéed in a spicy sauce).

For our salad – Ensaladang Talong (grilled eggplant, peeled and chopped, served with tomatoes and onions in a vinegar sauce).  For our main dishes – Tapa ni Ana (cured and air-dried stips of beef, deep-fried), Chicken Curry, Sinigang na Hipon (fresh jumbo shrimps in a tamarind-soured broth with lots of vegetables), Binukadkad na Tilapia (a whole tilapia, filleted, and deep-fried to a crisp), and Pinakbet (a stew of local vegetables, flavored with fermented shrimp paste, and served with crispy-fried pork).  We enjoyed all these together with Tinapa Rice (garlic fried rice flavored with smoked fish).  Drinks were either the Iced Lemon Tea or Iced Green Tea.

Only the best restaurant's in Asia make it to the Miele Guide! (From the Sunday Inquirer Magazine, 16 November 2008. This is from my personal collection of newspaper clippings.)

 

Kanin Club makes it to the first edition of the Miele Guide.

 

Filipino culinary icon, and my favorite, Margarita Araneta Fores said, "At least we have one restaurant in the Top 20!" I say, not bad at all!

 

What I wore to dinner

 

Copyright © 2010 by eNTeNG  c”,)™©’s  MunchTime™©.  All rights reserved.